Events

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  • Feb19

    The job fair is right around the corner. Come join WiCS tonight as we discuss the appropriate networking and LinkedIn etiquette, and help you shine as a candidate!

    7:00pm
    105 MLH
    Women in Computing Science (WiCS)
  • Feb20

    The Job Fair will be located in the Main Lounge & the Second Floor Ballroom in the Iowa Memorial Union. Check-in at Hubbard Commons.

    Check out the Career Fair App here:

    App Search Term: Career Fair Plus
    iOS App Link
    Android App Link

    11:00am to 3:00pm
    Main Lounge & the Second Floor Ballroom - IMU
  • Feb21

    One of the most common forms of data collection that you hear about in today's society is websites collecting usage information from their users. When used in the right hands, it's an incredibly helpful tool that helps you learn how to better your website or product! One such tool that makes collecting this information easy is Google Analytics. Be sure to have your social media blog (with ability to edit HTML, like Tumblr) or your own website ready as we delve into the code and show how easy it is to implement some basic tracking to your website!

    12:30pm to 2:00pm
    9 EPB
    SiTS - Students in Technology and Sciences
  • Feb22

    Welcome to the twelfth annual University of Iowa Computing Conference, hosted by students of the UI Department of Computer Science and ACM Student Chapter. The UICC is an official ACM Chapter Conference hosted on the University of Iowa campus, and is dedicated to advancing computing as a discipline and a profession.

    5:00pm to 8:00pm
    ACM University of Iowa Chapter
  • Feb22

    UICC 19 logoMulti-robot systems are now being used in industry. For example, hundreds of robots navigate autonomously in Amazon fulfillment centers to move inventory pods all the way from their storage locations to the inventory stations that need the products they store (and vice versa).

    6:00pm
    Shambaugh Auditorium, Main Library (LIB)
    Sven Koenig
    ACM University of Iowa Chapter
  • Feb25

    Google’s returning to The University of Iowa! We’ll be back on February 25-26 to host some sessions and workshops on campus for you to learn more about life at Google and specific job/internship opportunities we have for students.  We will have food and swag at most events while they last -- hope to see you there!

     

    Check out the details below and register for the event HERE

     

    2:30pm to 7:30pm
    See schedule for details
    Google
  • Feb27

    The increasing demand for computing power in big data analytics and machine learning applications have imposed new challenges in software systems to accelerate the computations on massively parallel hardware. In this talk, I will explain the new challenges of parallel computing with two motivating examples: User-Defined Aggregations (UDAs) and Stochastic Gradient Descent (SGD), which are two important routines in data analytics and machine learning and are hard to benefit from parallel computing.

    3:30pm to 4:30pm
    2217 SC
    Peng Jiang
    The Ohio State University | Department of Computer Science and Engineering
  • Feb27

    Curious about the language that game developers use to create virtual worlds? Shaders are how we tell the graphics processing unit to do these kinds of tasks, and GLSL is one of the most-used languages used to program these shaders. We'll use Shadertoy, a free website, to preview our shaders and discuss a few techniques that are used to render complex graphics.

    5:00pm to 6:30pm
    66 SH
    SiTS - Students in Technology and Sciences
  • Mar01

    Computer systems today are often heterogeneous and include accelerators like Graphic Processing Units (GPUs), due to their high performance and energy efficiency. Further, with the end of Moore's Law scaling for VLSI technology,instead of increased transistor counts, customization via specialized building blocks is expected to be the main source of performance improvement. Thus architectural heterogeneity is on the rise. But it poses a productivity challenge for application developers, with the need to write multiple versions of programs using platform-specific APIs.

    4:00pm to 5:00pm
    118 MLH
    Aravind Sukumaran Rajam
    The Ohio State University | Computer Science & Engineering
  • Mar05
    1:00pm to 2:00pm
    3 MLH (Muhly Lounge)
    Women in Computing Science (WiCS)
  • Mar06

    Software controls every device, system, and infrastructure serving our society. The rapid growth of complexity and high demand for human resources makes the task of building software tedious and error-prone. With techniques to automated reasoning, we hope to get more trustworthy, secure, and efficient programs; and in this talk, I will overview how such techniques can be built on top of solvers for Satisfiability Modulo Theories (SMT). SMT-based tools not only reveal bugs but also synthesize proofs that no bugs can ever occur.

    3:30pm to 4:30pm
    2217 SC
    Grigory Fedyukovich
    Princeton University | Computer Science Department
  • Mar07

    With billions of terabytes of data in the world, an important topic to know is where we can store that data. Cloud databases are a great scalable solution, and one such platform is the Google Cloud Platform! Join the Google Cloud Platform student partner, Niharika, and her fellow Student Innovator, Adam, as they work through how Google Cloud Platform can help house your data! 

    (No prior knowledge about Google Cloud Platform or programming is required for this talk.)

    12:30pm to 2:00pm
    9 EPB
    SiTS - Students in Technology and Sciences
  • Mar08

    Despite decades of investigation, software systems remain vulnerable to code defects. Even fewer assurance guarantees can be made about the reliability of new domains such as autonomous systems that are controlled by neural networks. The structure of a neural network poses significant challenges in reasoning about its lifetime operational behavior in a complex real-world environment.

    4:00pm to 5:00pm
    118 MLH
    He Zhu
    Galois | Purdue University (Computer Science)
  • Mar11

    Sensors and peripherals are becoming increasingly popular in the world of hardware and the Internet of Things. They help provide us the data we need to make the next big hardware project of our dreams. This talk will walk you through the basics of using sensors and peripherals in a basic hardware project.

    Minimal programming experience required. Several sensors and peripherals will be provided by SiTS, but if you have your own, feel free to bring them with to work alongside us on your own devices!

    5:00pm to 6:30pm
    66 SH
    SiTS - Students in Technology and Sciences
  • Mar27

    Virtual and augmented reality are at the forefront of graphics research. The limits of these technologies are still being explored, and in this workshop we'll discuss a few tools, such as the Windows Mixed Reality Simulator, that allow you to experiment with mixed reality, even without purchasing a headset!

    5:00pm to 6:30pm
    66 SH
    SiTS - Students in Technology and Sciences | Microsoft Student Partner
  • Apr01

    Following good coding practices to write readable code is no joke! Join us this April Fool's day to go over some good styling guidelines for your code and learn how to get involved with our new code review program!

    5:00pm to 6:30pm
    66 SH
    SiTS - Students in Technology and Sciences
  • Apr04

    With the massive amount of data that exists in our world, it's increasingly impossible to view our raw data and make sense of it. This is where data visualization tools come into play. Power BI is one such tool which allows us to place our data in a visual, more comprehensible, context. In this workshop, we'll be analyzing the data we've gathered from our Google Analytics talk to see how our website has performed over the semester.

    (No prior programming knowledge or knowledge about Power BI is required.)

    12:30pm to 2:00pm
    9 EPB
    SiTS - Students in Technology and Sciences | Microsoft Student Partner
  • Apr10
    6:30pm to 8:00pm
    2229 SC
    See program for details
    Women in Computing Science (WiCS)
  • Apr15

    Raspberry pi's are tiny affordable single-board computers that are nearly the size of a credit card. They enable you creating a portable version of your project with just a power source and, if you want an IoT device, an internet connection. They're a huge advantage for any hardware project due to their size and versatility! In this workshop, we'll be going over a basic project using this handy device!

    Minimal programming experience required. If you have a raspberry pi, feel free to bring it to the workshop!

    5:00pm to 6:30pm
    2520D UCC
    SiTS - Students in Technology and Sciences
  • Apr16
    7:00pm to 8:00pm
    105 MLH
    Women in Computing Science (WiCS)
  • Feb07
    6:00pm to 7:30pm
    TBD
    ACM University of Iowa Chapter
  • Feb07

    The Spring 2019 Engineering Career Fair will be geared towards engineering and computer science students graduating in May 2019 as well as students seeking summer and fall 2019 internships and co-ops.

    12:00pm to 4:00pm
    Main Lounge, Iowa Memorial Union
    College of Engineering | Pomerantz Career Center
  • Feb05

    Looking to practice up on your interviewing skills, or maybe just learn how to approach each type of interview question? Stop by this career series event to learn more!

    7:00pm to 8:00pm
    3 MLH (Muhly Lounge)
    Women in Computing Science (WiCS)
  • Feb04

    Rescheduled from 1/29

     

    Still looking for an internship, a full-time job, or just trying to improve your brand?

    Join WiCS as we work on improving your resume and your professional prospects! We'll be briefly reviewing resume guidelines and have peers who have worked at companies like Microsoft and State Farm review your resumes. If you don't have your resume started yet, you're still encouraged to attend, as we'll help you get started on one!

    7:00pm
    3 MLH (Muhly Lounge)
    Women in Computing Science (WiCS)
  • Feb01

    As the demands on our airspace increase and the systems we design grow ever-more complex to accommodate advancing technology, a question arises: how do we know we are safe? This talk demonstrates how formal methods are growing increasingly vital for the development of safety-critical aerospace systems, and our ability to ensure safety and security of new designs for the next era in air and space.

    4:00pm to 5:00pm
    118 MLH
    Kristin Yvonne Rozier
    Iowa State University | Laboratory for Temporal Logic in Aerospace Engineering
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